CCPA Regulations Update

NOTICE OF MODIFICATIONS TO TEXT OF PROPOSED REGULATIONS AND ADDITION OF DOCUMENTS AND INFORMATION TO RULEMAKING FILE

Update to Proposed Text

Pursuant to the requirements of Government Code section 11346.8, subdivision (c), and section 44 of Title 1 of the California Code of Regulations, the California Department of Justice (Department) is providing notice of changes made to the proposed regulations regarding the California Consumer Privacy Act, which were published and noticed for public comment on October 11, 2019.  These changes are in response to comments received regarding the proposed regulations and/or to clarify and conform the proposed regulations to existing law.  The originally proposed regulations, this Notice, the text of the proposed regulations as modified, and a comparison of the text as originally proposed with the modifications, are available at www.oag.ca.gov/privacy/ccpa.

Update to Documents and Other Information Relied Upon

Pursuant to the requirements of Government Code sections 11346.8, subdivision (d), 11346.9, subdivision (a)(1), and 11347.1, the Department is also providing notice that documents and other information which the Department has relied upon in adopting the proposed regulations have been added to the rulemaking file and are available for public inspection and comment.

The documents and information added to the rulemaking file are as follows:

Accenture Interactive, See people, not patterns. (2019). Available at https://www.accenture.com/_acnmedia/PDF-110/Accenture-See-People-Not-Patterns.pdf.

Cranor, et al., Design and Evaluation of a Usable Icon and Tagline to Signal an Opt-Out of the Sale of Personal Information as Required by CCPA (February 4, 2020).

Douglis, et al., How the CCPA impacts civil litigation (January 28, 2020).  Available at https://iapp.org/news/a/how-the-ccpa-impacts-civil-litigation/#.

Duffy, et al., Retail Loyalty Programs Will Survive Calif. Privacy Law (September 26, 2019), Law360.  Available at https://www.law360.com/articles/1202393/print?section=california.

Paternoster, Leon, Getting round GDPR with dark patters. A case study: Techradar (August 12, 2018).  Available at https://www.leonpaternoster.com/posts/techradar-gdpr/.

Simon, et al., Summary of Key Findings from California Privacy Survey (October 16, 2019), Goodwin Simon Strategic Research.  Available at https://www.caprivacy.org/post/icymi-summary-of-key-findings-from-california-privacy-survey.

World Wide Web Consortium, Web Content Accessibility Guidelines, version 2.1 (June 5, 2018).  Available at https://www.w3.org/TR/2018/REC-WCAG21-20180605/.

The Department is also providing notice that it will not be including the following study in the rulemaking file.

Javelin Strategy & Research, 2019 Identity Fraud Study: Fraudsters Seek New Targets and Victims Bear the Brunt (March 6, 2019).

The entire rulemaking file, which includes the documents referenced above, is available for inspection and copying throughout the rulemaking process during business hours at the location listed below.  In addition, some of the documents are available at www.oag.ca.gov/privacy/ccpa.

The Department will accept written comments regarding the proposed changes or materials added to the rulemaking file between Friday, February 7, 2020 and Monday, February 24, 2020. All written comments must be submitted to the Department no later than 5:00 p.m. on February 24, 2020 by email to PrivacyRegulations@doj.ca.gov, or by mail at the address listed below.

Lisa B. Kim, Privacy Regulations Coordinator
California Office of the Attorney General
300 South Spring Street, First Floor
Los Angeles, CA 90013
Email: PrivacyRegulations@doj.ca.gov

All timely comments received that pertain to the changes to the proposed regulations or the new materials added will be reviewed and responded to by the Department’s staff as part of the compilation of the rulemaking file.  Please limit written comments to those items.

So, how much is this damn CCPA thing gonna #$@&%* cost me?!

The short answer? A lot, but not as much as you might have been told…

As I’ve traveled around California doing my “Blessings of the CCPA” presentation, I’ve been asked repeatedly about the “average” cost of a CCPA solution from CFO’s, GC’s and IT folks alike. It’s a loaded question as there are many requirements to the law, from policy and website disclosures to consumer data request obligations. One size does not fit all and your organization needs to spend time methodically planning its approach before setting aside budget and other resources.

While some unprepared organizations may need to beef up spending in the near-term, others may end up refining their programs over the coming years as they realize their initial investment wasn’t as strategic as it probably needs to be.

ILTA Blackberry and CAPP Presentation
At the San Diego ILTA Presentation of “Preparing for the California Consumer Privacy Act”

Decision makers, consider the following:

  • What’s our true risk exposure based on the personal data we already collect, sell, barter, manage, etc. on behalf of our business partners?
  • Can we do this all in-house or should we outsource some of it?
  • Do we have any existing talent and software that might help streamline some of the CCPA’s major workstreams like data mapping?
  • What kind of fundamental changes are we willing to make to our IT infrastructure?
  • Do we fully automate self-service requests through API’s and is that even the right idea, long-term, given our risk, the evolving nature of IT and emerging legislation?
  • How can taking a principle based approach to privacy using concepts like data minimization to insulate us going forward?

Click here for a free CCPA Roadmap from Compliance and Privacy Partners.

Clearly, all of us subject to the law need to protect our business and expect some activity, whether it be through consumer requests or even the limited right of private action afforded by the CCPA. That doesn’t mean you turn your entire organization upside down and fork over hundreds of thousands of dollars in licensing ransom! Change management on this scale first requires proper risk analysis, roadmapping and getting stakeholders to buy-in and be accountable.

Then what’s my next step?

Before you embark on this journey to become a privacy-centric company, the real question you should be asking yourself is….

Are there consultants and affordable software solutions out there that will leverage our resources and best minds to help us implement a proportional strategy that protects us? 

The answer to that last question is YES!

Slide4
CAPP’s California Consumer Privacy Act Roadmap

Long-term solutions need to be fact-based and reasonable, recognizing the unique facets of your culture and business model. Big, complex and expensive isn’t always better.

It’s true there are some amazingly fancy privacy software products out there. But do you really want to spend a quarter to half-a-million dollars a year to fend off what might ultimately be a handful of consumer requests and opt-outs, when you can do the exact same thing with a far less expensive and better tool?

The bottom line…

There are so many vendors playing in the privacy space today and way too many folks are impulsively investing either too heavily or disproportionately in them just to “check the box.” Yes, of course you need to “check the box,” but running headfirst into this regulatory challenge could leave you with a budget nightmare and organizational headache you’ll soon regret.

The bottom line is your investment needs to be proportional to your risk profile and the complexity of your infrastructure and organization. Even then, you may not need a solution that costs you hundreds of thousands of dollars when you could be compliant and sleep comfortably for under $50,000 a year.

Call us today at 323-413-7432, schedule a free consultation or visit us at www.capp-llc.com to learn more about our tailored privacy compliance solutions.

California Dreamin’ – A Free Roadmap For your CCPA Journey

What is the CCPA and why should you care?

In response to recent stateside efforts to enshrine data protection including the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA), organizations are revisiting the efficacy of their Data and Information Governance (IG) programs. Laws and regulations vary by industry and company size. Yet each intend to protect consumer’s personal data by prescribing technical and governance standards backed by stiff penalties for non-compliance.


What you need to know and do to ensure compliance with California’s new Consumer Privacy Act

New regulations governing use of customer and personal data needn’t be burdensome.  Rather, they help reduce expenses and monetize the information lifecycle, identify opportunities for better governance to avoid fines and litigation exposure and foster trust to enhance customer experiences. Download this FREE detailed CCPA roadmap to see how you can get your company on the path to compliance.


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Our CCPA and GDPR engagements include:

  • Data and resource mapping
  • Conducting gap and risk assessments
  • Controls evaluation to standards
  • Establishing governance with clearly defined roles and responsibilities
  • Policies and procedures review
  • Domestic and International legal review of privacy and security policies to fit the organization’s risk profile and culture
  • Consumer data request and delivery mechanism (including website notices)
  • Providing education and training
  • Design of role-based access control (RBAC) rights
  • Privacy impact assessment (PIA/DPIA) during product design

Third Party Due Diligence Support

  • Pre-contract due diligence and consulting
  • Cloud services guidance
  • Managed security services (build or buy guidance)
  • Third-party management program/policy

Our consulting and software solutions enable clients to comply with CCPA provisions 1798.110(a)(4), 1798.100, 1798.105, 1798.110, 1798.120, 1798.145, 1798.140, 1798.150


Call us today to see how we can help you with:

  • California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018, Amendments and Rulemaking
  • HIPAA/HITECH Security, Privacy and Breach Notification Rules
  • Generally Accepted Privacy Principles (GAPP)
  • EU’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR)
  • ISO/IEC 27001-2:2013
  • CIS Top 20 Critical Security Controls (CA AG requires)
  • SEC OCIE Cybersecurity Initiative
  • NIST Cybersecurity Framework
  • U.S. Sentencing/DOJ/OIG Guidelines for Effective Compliance (program foundation)
  • Applying Risk Management Program Management and Principles

Join us in San Diego for ILTA: Preparing for the California Consumer Privacy Act

Event Description

When:  Oct 30, 2019 from 12:00 PM to 1:30 PM (PT)

Where: Klinedinst, 501 West Broadway, Suite 600 San Diego, CA 92101

REGISTER HERE

We share and store our most sensitive personally identifiable information (PII) on countless computers, networks, and devices. Within an organization, PII can be found scattered in emails, databases, shared drives and more. The new California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) is making a strong privacy program an essential part of an organization’s records and information governance program. Join our presentation as we discuss:

  • How are you leveraging the focus on privacy and complying with this new law?
  • Is Record and Information Governance at the table for the conversation?
  • Will you and your organization be ready when the Act goes into effect on January 1?

Speakers

Faron Lyons – Enterprise Account Manager, Blackberry

Rafael Moscatel – Managing Director, Compliance and Privacy Partners