NOTICE OF THIRD SET OF PROPOSED MODIFICATIONS TO TEXT OF CCPA REGULATIONS

Pursuant to the requirements of Government Code section 11346.8, subdivision (c), and section 44 of Title 1 of the California Code of Regulations, the California Department of Justice (Department) is providing notice of a third set of proposed modifications made to the regulations regarding the California Consumer Privacy Act.    

The Department first published and noticed the proposed regulations for public comment on October 11, 2019.  On February 10, 2020 and March 11, 2020, the Department gave notice of modifications to the proposed regulations, based on comments received during the relevant comment periods.  The Department withdrew the following sections from the review of the Office Administrative Law (OAL) pursuant to Government Code section 11349.3, subd. (c):  999.305(a)(5), 999.306(b)(2), 999.315(c), and 999.326(c).  OAL approved the other sections submitted by the Department, effective August 14, 2020, and these provisions became final.

The modifications are indicated by bold blue underline for proposed additions and red strike out for proposed deletions to the regulations that became effective on August 14, 2020.  This third set of modifications include the following changes:

  • Proposed section 999.306, subd. (b)(3), provides examples of how businesses that collect personal information in the course of interacting with consumers offline can provide the notice of right to opt-out of the sale of personal information through an offline method.
  • Proposed section 999.315, subd. (h), provides guidance on how a business’s methods for submitting requests to opt-out should be easy and require minimal steps.  It provides illustrative examples of methods designed with the purpose or substantial effect of subverting or impairing a consumer’s choice to opt-out.
  • Proposed section 999.326, subd. (a), clarifies the proof that a business may require an authorized agent to provide, as well as what the business may require a consumer to do to verify their request.
  • Proposed section 999.332, subd. (a), clarifies that businesses subject to either section 999.330, section 999.331, or both of these sections are required to include a description of the processes set forth in those sections in their privacy policies.

This Notice, the text of the third set of proposed modifications to the regulations, and a comparison of the text as approved by the Office of Administrative Law with the currently proposed modifications are available at www.oag.ca.gov/privacy/ccpa/current.  The originally proposed regulations and all documents relating to the rulemaking package, including previous modifications to the proposed regulations, are also available at this website.

The Department will accept written comments regarding the proposed changes between Tuesday, October 13, 2020 and Wednesday, October 28, 2020. Please limit comments to the additions indicated in bold blue underline and the deletions indicated in red strike out.  All written comments on the underlined changes must be submitted to the Department no later than 5:00 p.m. on October 28, 2020 by email to PrivacyRegulations@doj.ca.gov, or by mail to the address listed below.

Approval of Final Regulations Under the California Consumer Privacy Act

California Attorney General Xavier Becerra today announced approval by the Office of Administrative Law (OAL) of final regulations under the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA). Proposed final regulations were submitted to the OAL by Attorney General Becerra on June 1, 2020. During OAL’s review process, additional revisions were made to the proposed regulations. The approved regulations go into effect immediately.

“In California, privacy is an inalienable right. Californians should control who possesses their personal data and how it’s used,” said Attorney General Becerra. “With these rules finalized, California breaks ground and leads the nation to protect and advance data privacy. These rules guide consumers and businesses alike on how to implement the California Consumer Privacy Act. As we face a pandemic of historic proportions, it is particularly critical to be mindful of personal data security.”

CCPA was signed into law on June 28, 2018, and was further amended on September 23, 2018 by SB 1121 and on October 11, 2019 by AB 25, AB 874, AB 1146, AB 1355, and AB 1564. The law went into effect on January 1, 2020. CCPA grants California consumers robust data privacy rights and control over their personal information including the right to know, the right to delete, and the right to opt-out of the sale of personal information that businesses collect, and includes additional protections for minors. The regulations establish procedures for compliance and exercise of rights, as well as clarifying important transparency and accountability mechanisms for businesses subject to the law.

The regulations approved by OAL were drafted after a broad and inclusive preliminary rulemaking process, which included seven public forums, during which the office received over 300 letters. During the formal rulemaking process, Attorney General Becerra held four public hearings throughout the state, along with a 45-day comment period and two subsequent 15-day comment periods. These comment periods resulted in the submission of over 1,000 public comments, each of which were taken into consideration when drafting the final regulations.

A copy of the approved final regulations can be found here.

California Privacy Act – What Businesses Need To Do, Now.

After much anticipation, the California Attorney General (AG) announced in early June 2020 that the final California Consumer Protection Act (CCPA) regulations were being submitted to the Office of Administrative Law (OAL) for review. Once approved by the OAL, the final regulation text will be filed with the Secretary of State and become enforceable by law.

Because enforcement of the CCPA began on July 1, 2020, now is the time for covered businesses and service providers to size-up their compliance efforts. Although there are many issues that remain unclear, the regulations may provide a road map to the AG’s enforcement priorities. Among the issues addressed by the final regulations—as well as the AG’s “Final Statement of Reasons” which accompanied those regulations— are the following:

  • Privacy Policy: A business’ privacy policy must inform consumers of their rights under the CCPA and how they can submit requests to know or delete personal information. In addition, the privacy policy should disclose the categories of personal information collected, the categories of personal information disclosed for a business purpose or sold to a third party and provide on a per category basis the categories of third parties to whom the information was disclosed or sold.
  • Required Notices: The final regulations detail the information that should be included in the various notices. They also require business to use “plain, straightforward language” and a format that draws the consumer’s attention to the notice. In addition, the AG clarified that the regulations do “not require a cookie banner, but rather leave it to businesses to determine the formats that will best achieve the result in particular environments. In other words, it appears that the use and nature of tracking technologies can be disclosed in the privacy policy assuming that policy is readily available to the public.
  • Service Providers: The regulations require that service providers use the personal information they receive from businesses “to process or maintain personal information on behalf of the business … and in compliance with the written contract for services required by the CCPA,” except in certain narrowly-defined circumstances, such as building or improving the quality of their services. If an entity qualifies as a service provider, the transfer of information from a business to them is not deemed a sale. Moreover, the Final Statement of Reasons clarifies that service providers do not lose their status as service providers merely because they collect consumers’ personal information directly, if that collection is performed at the business’s direction and on behalf of that business.
  • Subcontractors: The regulations provide that service providers may hire subcontractors, as long as the subcontractors meet all the requirements for a “service provider” set forth in the CCPA and the regulations.
  • User-Enabled Privacy Controls: Businesses must honor privacy controls that clearly communicate or signal that the consumer intends to opt out of the sale of personal information.
  • Training and Recordkeeping: The regulations require training for all individuals responsible for handling consumer inquiries. Businesses must also retain records of consumer requests and how the business responded to such request for 24 months.
  • No Discrimination: A business cannot discriminate against a consumer for exercising his or her rights under the CCPA.

CCPA Proposed Regulations Submitted to the Office of Administrative Law

California Attorney General Xavier Becerra submitted final proposed regulations under the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) to the California Office of Administrative Law (OAL). The regulations will provide guidance to businesses on how to comply with the CCPA and will enable consumers to exercise new rights over their personal information. Under Executive Order N-40-20 related to the COVID-19 pandemic, OAL has 30 working days and an additional 60 calendar days to determine whether the regulations satisfy the procedural requirements of the Administrative Procedure Act. Once approved by the OAL, the final regulation text will be filed with the Secretary of State and become enforceable by law.

A copy of the complete rulemaking package submitted to OAL, including a text of the regulations, can be found at www.oag.ca.gov/ccpa.

The final proposed regulations were drafted after a broad and inclusive preliminary rulemaking process, which included seven public forums, during which the office received over 300 letters. During the formal rulemaking process, Attorney General Becerra held four public hearings throughout the state, along with a 45-day comment period and two subsequent 15-day comment periods. These comment periods resulted in the submission of over 1,000 public comments, each of which were taken into consideration when drafting the final regulations.

So, how much is this damn CCPA thing gonna #$@&%* cost me?! – Rafael Moscatel

The short answer? A lot, but not as much as you might have been told…

via So, how much is this damn CCPA thing gonna #$@&%* cost me?! – Rafael Moscatel

ILTA Blackberry and CAPP Presentation

As I’ve traveled around California doing my “Blessings of the CCPA” presentation, I’ve been asked repeatedly about the “average” cost of a CCPA solution from CFO’s, GC’s and IT folks alike. It’s a loaded question as there are many requirements to the law, from policy and website disclosures to consumer data request obligations. One size does not fit all and your organization needs to spend time methodically planning its approach before setting aside budget and other resources.

While some unprepared organizations may need to beef up spending in the near-term, others may end up refining their programs over the coming years as they realize their initial investment wasn’t as strategic as it probably needs to be.

Decision makers, consider the following:

  • What’s our true risk exposure based on the personal data we already collect, sell, barter, manage, etc. on behalf of our business partners?
  • Can we do this all in-house or should we outsource some of it?
  • Do we have any existing talent and software that might help streamline some of the CCPA’s major workstreams like data mapping?
  • What kind of fundamental changes are we willing to make to our IT infrastructure?
  • Do we fully automate self-service requests through API’s and is that even the right idea, long-term, given our risk, the evolving nature of IT and emerging legislation?
  • How can taking a principle based approach to privacy using concepts like data minimization to insulate us going forward?

Click here for a free CCPA Roadmap from Compliance and Privacy Partners.

Clearly, all of us subject to the law need to protect our business and expect some activity, whether it be through consumer requests or even the limited right of private action afforded by the CCPA. That doesn’t mean you turn your entire organization upside down and fork over hundreds of thousands of dollars in licensing ransom! Change management on this scale first requires proper risk analysis, roadmapping and getting stakeholders to buy-in and be accountable.

Then what’s my next step?

Before you embark on this journey to become a privacy-centric company, the real question you should be asking yourself is….

Are there consultants and affordable software solutions out there that will leverage our resources and best minds to help us implement a proportional strategy that protects us? 

The answer to that last question is YES!

Slide4
CAPP’s California Consumer Privacy Act Roadmap

Long-term solutions need to be fact-based and reasonable, recognizing the unique facets of your culture and business model. Big, complex and expensive isn’t always better.

It’s true there are some amazingly fancy privacy software products out there. But do you really want to spend a quarter to half-a-million dollars a year to fend off what might ultimately be a handful of consumer requests and opt-outs, when you can do the exact same thing with a far less expensive and better tool?

The bottom line…

There are so many vendors playing in the privacy space today and way too many folks are impulsively investing either too heavily or disproportionately in them just to “check the box.” Yes, of course you need to “check the box,” but running headfirst into this regulatory challenge could leave you with a budget nightmare and organizational headache you’ll soon regret.

The bottom line is your investment needs to be proportional to your risk profile and the complexity of your infrastructure and organization. Even then, you may not need a solution that costs you hundreds of thousands of dollars when you could be compliant and sleep comfortably for under $50,000 a year.

Call us today at 323-413-7432, schedule a free consultation or visit us at www.capp-llc.com to learn more about our tailored privacy compliance solutions.

CCPA Regulations Update

NOTICE OF MODIFICATIONS TO TEXT OF PROPOSED REGULATIONS AND ADDITION OF DOCUMENTS AND INFORMATION TO RULEMAKING FILE

Update to Proposed Text

Pursuant to the requirements of Government Code section 11346.8, subdivision (c), and section 44 of Title 1 of the California Code of Regulations, the California Department of Justice (Department) is providing notice of changes made to the proposed regulations regarding the California Consumer Privacy Act, which were published and noticed for public comment on October 11, 2019.  These changes are in response to comments received regarding the proposed regulations and/or to clarify and conform the proposed regulations to existing law.  The originally proposed regulations, this Notice, the text of the proposed regulations as modified, and a comparison of the text as originally proposed with the modifications, are available at www.oag.ca.gov/privacy/ccpa.

Update to Documents and Other Information Relied Upon

Pursuant to the requirements of Government Code sections 11346.8, subdivision (d), 11346.9, subdivision (a)(1), and 11347.1, the Department is also providing notice that documents and other information which the Department has relied upon in adopting the proposed regulations have been added to the rulemaking file and are available for public inspection and comment.

The documents and information added to the rulemaking file are as follows:

Accenture Interactive, See people, not patterns. (2019). Available at https://www.accenture.com/_acnmedia/PDF-110/Accenture-See-People-Not-Patterns.pdf.

Cranor, et al., Design and Evaluation of a Usable Icon and Tagline to Signal an Opt-Out of the Sale of Personal Information as Required by CCPA (February 4, 2020).

Douglis, et al., How the CCPA impacts civil litigation (January 28, 2020).  Available at https://iapp.org/news/a/how-the-ccpa-impacts-civil-litigation/#.

Duffy, et al., Retail Loyalty Programs Will Survive Calif. Privacy Law (September 26, 2019), Law360.  Available at https://www.law360.com/articles/1202393/print?section=california.

Paternoster, Leon, Getting round GDPR with dark patters. A case study: Techradar (August 12, 2018).  Available at https://www.leonpaternoster.com/posts/techradar-gdpr/.

Simon, et al., Summary of Key Findings from California Privacy Survey (October 16, 2019), Goodwin Simon Strategic Research.  Available at https://www.caprivacy.org/post/icymi-summary-of-key-findings-from-california-privacy-survey.

World Wide Web Consortium, Web Content Accessibility Guidelines, version 2.1 (June 5, 2018).  Available at https://www.w3.org/TR/2018/REC-WCAG21-20180605/.

The Department is also providing notice that it will not be including the following study in the rulemaking file.

Javelin Strategy & Research, 2019 Identity Fraud Study: Fraudsters Seek New Targets and Victims Bear the Brunt (March 6, 2019).

The entire rulemaking file, which includes the documents referenced above, is available for inspection and copying throughout the rulemaking process during business hours at the location listed below.  In addition, some of the documents are available at www.oag.ca.gov/privacy/ccpa.

The Department will accept written comments regarding the proposed changes or materials added to the rulemaking file between Friday, February 7, 2020 and Monday, February 24, 2020. All written comments must be submitted to the Department no later than 5:00 p.m. on February 24, 2020 by email to PrivacyRegulations@doj.ca.gov, or by mail at the address listed below.

Lisa B. Kim, Privacy Regulations Coordinator
California Office of the Attorney General
300 South Spring Street, First Floor
Los Angeles, CA 90013
Email: PrivacyRegulations@doj.ca.gov

All timely comments received that pertain to the changes to the proposed regulations or the new materials added will be reviewed and responded to by the Department’s staff as part of the compilation of the rulemaking file.  Please limit written comments to those items.

CCPA Rulemaking Activities – Upcoming Hearings

CPA Rulemaking Activities – Upcoming Hearings

On October 10, 2018, the Attorney General released proposed regulations for the California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018 (CCPA).  The California Department of Justice (DOJ) will hold four public hearings to provide all interested persons the opportunity to present statements or comments on the proposed regulations, as detailed below.  The hearings will begin promptly at 10:00 a.m. and will conclude when the last speaker has finished their presentation.  Please note that attendees may be required to go through building security before entering each venue.  For more information about the public hearings, and to RSVP, please visit: https://www.oag.ca.gov/privacy/ccpa/rsvp.

The deadline to submit written comments is December 6, 2019 at 5:00 p.m. (PST).  Comments may be submitted via email (PrivacyRegulations@doj.ca.gov), mail (Privacy Regulations Coordinator, California Office of the Attorney General, 300 South Spring Street, First Floor, Los Angeles, CA 90013), or at the public hearings.

Please visit www.oag.ca.gov/privacy/ccpa for information about the DOJ’s CCPA rulemaking process, including the following newly added pdfs:  Tips on Submitting Effective Comments and Information about the Rulemaking Process.

PUBLIC HEARING DATES

Sacramento
December 2, 2019; 10:00 a.m.
CalEPA Building
Coastal Room, 2nd Floor
1001 I Street
Sacramento, CA 95814

Los Angeles
December 3, 2019; 10:00 a.m.
Ronald Reagan Building
Auditorium, 1st Floor
300 S. Spring Street
Los Angeles, CA 90013

San Francisco
December 4, 2019; 10:00 a.m.
Milton Marks Conference Center
Lower Level
455 Golden Gate Ave.
San Francisco, CA 94102

Fresno
December 5, 2019; 10:00 a.m.
Fresno Hugh Burns Building
Assembly Room #1036
2550 Mariposa Mall
Fresno, CA 93721

Say Hello To Pika, The Privacy Pup!

Compliance & Privacy Partners provides smart and affordable privacy compliance, data governance and risk-management solutions designed to help organizations build privacy programs, assess, manage and remediate risks and demonstrate defensible compliance. We offer and support a variety of data privacy management platforms which include data subject fulfillment workflows, records and PI inventory management, vendor assessment and policy adherence tools, privacy impact assessments, file analysis projects and records retention enforcement.

Click here to take charge of your data challenges by contacting us today for a free consultation. We offer free 1-hour IG and CCPA workshops for interested companies.

Google pushes out important updates about the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA)

On Monday, November 18th, Google AdSense pushed out the following updates regarding the California Consumer Privacy Act:

from Google:

The California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) is a new data privacy law that applies to certain businesses which collect personal information from California residents. The new law goes into effect on January 1, 2020.
Google already offers data protection terms pursuant to the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) in Europe. We are now also offering service provider terms under the CCPA, which will supplement those existing data protection terms (revised to reflect the CCPA), effective January 1, 2020. For customers on our online contracts and updated platform contracts, the service provider terms will be incorporated into our existing contracts via the data protection terms. For such customers, there is no action required on your part to add the service provider terms into your contract.
These service provider terms will be made available alongside new tools for partners to enable restricted data processing. Restricted data processing is intended to help partners prepare for CCPA. Some partners may decide to send a restricted data processing signal for users who click a CCPA opt-out link. Other partners may decide to enable restricted data processing for all users in California via a control in our products. Subject to the service provider terms, we will act as your CCPA service provider with respect to data processed while restricted data processing is enabled. You can refer to this article for more information on restricted data processing and to determine whether restricted data processing meets your CCPA compliance needs. Please also refer to our Help Center articles for Ad ManagerAdMobAdSense for more information on enabling restricted data processing.
Please see privacy.google.com/businesses for more information about Google’s data privacy policies.

Compliance & Privacy Partners provides smart and affordable privacy compliance, data governance and risk-management solutions designed to help organizations build privacy programs, assess, manage and remediate risks and demonstrate defensible compliance. We offer and support a variety of data privacy management platforms which include data subject fulfillment workflows, records and PI inventory management, vendor assessment and policy adherence tools, privacy impact assessments, file analysis projects and records retention enforcement.

Call us today at 323-413-7432, schedule a free consultation or visit us at www.capp-llc.com to learn more about our tailored privacy compliance solutions.

So, how much is this damn CCPA thing gonna #$@&%* cost me?!

The short answer? A lot, but not as much as you might have been told…

As I’ve traveled around California doing my “Blessings of the CCPA” presentation, I’ve been asked repeatedly about the “average” cost of a CCPA solution from CFO’s, GC’s and IT folks alike. It’s a loaded question as there are many requirements to the law, from policy and website disclosures to consumer data request obligations. One size does not fit all and your organization needs to spend time methodically planning its approach before setting aside budget and other resources.

While some unprepared organizations may need to beef up spending in the near-term, others may end up refining their programs over the coming years as they realize their initial investment wasn’t as strategic as it probably needs to be.

ILTA Blackberry and CAPP Presentation
At the San Diego ILTA Presentation of “Preparing for the California Consumer Privacy Act”

Decision makers, consider the following:

  • What’s our true risk exposure based on the personal data we already collect, sell, barter, manage, etc. on behalf of our business partners?
  • Can we do this all in-house or should we outsource some of it?
  • Do we have any existing talent and software that might help streamline some of the CCPA’s major workstreams like data mapping?
  • What kind of fundamental changes are we willing to make to our IT infrastructure?
  • Do we fully automate self-service requests through API’s and is that even the right idea, long-term, given our risk, the evolving nature of IT and emerging legislation?
  • How can taking a principle based approach to privacy using concepts like data minimization to insulate us going forward?

Click here for a free CCPA Roadmap from Compliance and Privacy Partners.

Clearly, all of us subject to the law need to protect our business and expect some activity, whether it be through consumer requests or even the limited right of private action afforded by the CCPA. That doesn’t mean you turn your entire organization upside down and fork over hundreds of thousands of dollars in licensing ransom! Change management on this scale first requires proper risk analysis, roadmapping and getting stakeholders to buy-in and be accountable.

Then what’s my next step?

Before you embark on this journey to become a privacy-centric company, the real question you should be asking yourself is….

Are there consultants and affordable software solutions out there that will leverage our resources and best minds to help us implement a proportional strategy that protects us? 

The answer to that last question is YES!

Slide4
CAPP’s California Consumer Privacy Act Roadmap

Long-term solutions need to be fact-based and reasonable, recognizing the unique facets of your culture and business model. Big, complex and expensive isn’t always better.

It’s true there are some amazingly fancy privacy software products out there. But do you really want to spend a quarter to half-a-million dollars a year to fend off what might ultimately be a handful of consumer requests and opt-outs, when you can do the exact same thing with a far less expensive and better tool?

The bottom line…

There are so many vendors playing in the privacy space today and way too many folks are impulsively investing either too heavily or disproportionately in them just to “check the box.” Yes, of course you need to “check the box,” but running headfirst into this regulatory challenge could leave you with a budget nightmare and organizational headache you’ll soon regret.

The bottom line is your investment needs to be proportional to your risk profile and the complexity of your infrastructure and organization. Even then, you may not need a solution that costs you hundreds of thousands of dollars when you could be compliant and sleep comfortably for under $50,000 a year.

Call us today at 323-413-7432, schedule a free consultation or visit us at www.capp-llc.com to learn more about our tailored privacy compliance solutions.

California Dreamin’ – A Free Roadmap For your CCPA Journey

What is the CCPA and why should you care?

In response to recent stateside efforts to enshrine data protection including the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA), organizations are revisiting the efficacy of their Data and Information Governance (IG) programs. Laws and regulations vary by industry and company size. Yet each intend to protect consumer’s personal data by prescribing technical and governance standards backed by stiff penalties for non-compliance.


What you need to know and do to ensure compliance with California’s new Consumer Privacy Act

New regulations governing use of customer and personal data needn’t be burdensome.  Rather, they help reduce expenses and monetize the information lifecycle, identify opportunities for better governance to avoid fines and litigation exposure and foster trust to enhance customer experiences. Download this FREE detailed CCPA roadmap to see how you can get your company on the path to compliance.


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Our CCPA and GDPR engagements include:

  • Data and resource mapping
  • Conducting gap and risk assessments
  • Controls evaluation to standards
  • Establishing governance with clearly defined roles and responsibilities
  • Policies and procedures review
  • Domestic and International legal review of privacy and security policies to fit the organization’s risk profile and culture
  • Consumer data request and delivery mechanism (including website notices)
  • Providing education and training
  • Design of role-based access control (RBAC) rights
  • Privacy impact assessment (PIA/DPIA) during product design

Third Party Due Diligence Support

  • Pre-contract due diligence and consulting
  • Cloud services guidance
  • Managed security services (build or buy guidance)
  • Third-party management program/policy

Our consulting and software solutions enable clients to comply with CCPA provisions 1798.110(a)(4), 1798.100, 1798.105, 1798.110, 1798.120, 1798.145, 1798.140, 1798.150


Call us today to see how we can help you with:

  • California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018, Amendments and Rulemaking
  • HIPAA/HITECH Security, Privacy and Breach Notification Rules
  • Generally Accepted Privacy Principles (GAPP)
  • EU’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR)
  • ISO/IEC 27001-2:2013
  • CIS Top 20 Critical Security Controls (CA AG requires)
  • SEC OCIE Cybersecurity Initiative
  • NIST Cybersecurity Framework
  • U.S. Sentencing/DOJ/OIG Guidelines for Effective Compliance (program foundation)
  • Applying Risk Management Program Management and Principles

New Podcast: #GRC and Me – The Blessing of #CCPA

EPISODE SUMMARY:

Rafael Moscatel, managing director at CAPP, joins GRC & Me to discuss how his background in law and consulting ultimately led him to the world of GRC. He shares how one tweet led to a watershed moment in compliance and privacy, and tells his deeply personal connection to California adoption records. Rafael also explains how CCPA should be viewed as a blessing that helps better understand what’s “under the hood” of your company.

EPISODE NOTES:

Top 3 Quotes

  • “The more that you can show your customers that you’re being a good steward with their data, the more they’re likely to trust you. And from a reputational standpoint and a branding standpoint, that’s always one of the best benefits and one of the reasons that consumers will choose one product or service over the other.”
  • “And I think if you look carefully, the CCPA is quite a blessing. It helps reduce expenses and monetize the information life cycle because you have a better understanding of what’s under the hood in your company.”
  • “…you know there’s not one silver bullet when it comes to preparing data for an information governance strategy, IG is essentially a multidisciplinary type of approach.”

Show Highlights

[01:28] Rafael’s background in law and consulting
[02:35] Discussing Rafel’s company and beginnings
[04:36] The “Olympics of Privacy”
[05:59] A watershed moment in Compliance and Privacy
[08:05] Rafael’s personal connection to records in California
[09:05] The incredible moment Rafael received his birth records
[12:00] The “blessing” of CCPA
[14:11] Rafael’s personal opinion of CCPA
[16:19] Best practices for privacy and policy management
[19:30] Policy management systems
[21:04] How to read more about Rafael’s thoughts on these issues
[22:58] The Little Girl With The Big Voice
[24:03] Vendor Risk Management
[25:00] Being mindful of what’s outside your company walls as well as what’s within them

Resources:

Join us in San Diego for ILTA: Preparing for the California Consumer Privacy Act

Event Description

When:  Oct 30, 2019 from 12:00 PM to 1:30 PM (PT)

Where: Klinedinst, 501 West Broadway, Suite 600 San Diego, CA 92101

REGISTER HERE

We share and store our most sensitive personally identifiable information (PII) on countless computers, networks, and devices. Within an organization, PII can be found scattered in emails, databases, shared drives and more. The new California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) is making a strong privacy program an essential part of an organization’s records and information governance program. Join our presentation as we discuss:

  • How are you leveraging the focus on privacy and complying with this new law?
  • Is Record and Information Governance at the table for the conversation?
  • Will you and your organization be ready when the Act goes into effect on January 1?

Speakers

Faron Lyons – Enterprise Account Manager, Blackberry

Rafael Moscatel – Managing Director, Compliance and Privacy Partners

Williams Data Management to Host Data Protection Lunch with Compliance and Privacy Partners at Century City Chamber of Commerce

Media Contact: Ally Bertik ally@marketingmaven.com (310) 405-0358  

Williams Data Management to Host Data Protection Lunch at Century City Chamber of Commerce

Leader in Data Protection Partners with Cyber Hygienist and Technology Expert to Discuss How Fiduciaries Can Prepare and Protect Their Businesses for Data Breaches

­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­ _____________________________________________________________________________

LOS ANGELES.  – (September 18, 2019)  Williams Data Management, southern California’s leader in data protection, has partnered with Rafael Moscatel, managing director of Compliance and Privacy Partners, and George Baldonado, president and CEO of Oasis Technology, Inc. to host a “Data Protection, A Primer For Your Fiduciary: It’s Your Business, Protect It!” lunch​ in conjunction with the Century City Chamber of Commerce. The panel will take place from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. on October 3, 2019 at Greenberg Glusker, 1900 Avenue of the Stars, Suite 1400 in Century City, California.

Data Protection Pro, Douglas C. Williams, president and CEO of Williams Data Management will discuss how small businesses can take advantage of a data breach reporting service powered by CSR Privacy Solutions, Inc. to enable companies to protect Personally Identifiable Information (PII). Other topics will include the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA), cyber security protection and data governance.

“We are thrilled to lead the conversation for fiduciaries on how to better protect their businesses,” said Williams. “Our goal is to keep your information safe, secure and available regardless of what it is or where it is stored. We hope to provide a clear solution for companies in all industries moving forward, especially with our new data protection suite that provides a pathway for self-assessment and structural gap analysis for internal management.”

Guests will have the opportunity to network with business professionals, engage in this informative panel with expert sources and enjoy lunch provided by Williams Data Management.

To learn more or register for the data protection lunch, please visit https://business.centurycitycc.com/events/details/data-protection-a-primer-for-your-fiduciary-it-s-your-business-protect-it-1704.  

About Williams Data Management

Williams Data Management is southern California’s leading source for data protection management. The company educates, consults, has the source materials, and provides the structure for self-assessment and corporate plan structure for information breach notifications in the United States. Over the last decade, the firm has become an expert solution provider, offering professional records management, data protection, imaging and digitization, cloud storage and certified data destruction services to all sectors and sizes of businesses.

Williams holds numerous certifications for data compliance and destruction including SSAE16, NAID “AAA” Certification, and is a member of PRISM. For more information, visit www.williamsdatamanagement.com or call 888-478-FILE.

About Century City Chamber of Commerce

The Century City Chamber of Commerce is one of Los Angeles’ most active, involved and relationship-driven chambers. The chamber places a special emphasis on its members working together to build effective relationships and relevant programs that help individuals and companies expand their marketplace reach. Under the clear and powerful guidance of many energetic committees and councils, the Century City Chamber has grown to encompass representatives from virtually every industry, helping to make Century City one of Los Angeles’ most prestigious business communities. From the largest corporations to mid-sized businesses and emerging entrepreneurs, its diverse members thrive with one another and with key decision makers.

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